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Posts Tagged ‘process’

I’ll just share the McBride Construction Photos of the sandy colored concrete sills on the strawbale:

www.instagram.com/p/COfuDyWH_s_/

photo (& sill) by John McBride

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The builder (John McBride) sent these photos of the interior plaster, the deep windows, and the interior all cleaned up, ready for plastering.

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Hydraulic lime plaster is similar to cement stucco, but with lime rather than portland cement. It is more flexible and more vapor permeable than cement stucco, but it takes more skill and curing time. It also requires warmer temperatures. While making portland cement requires a lot of energy and the chemical reaction releases large quantities of CO2 into the atmosphere, Manufacturing lime takes energy, but when lime plaster carbonates (hardens) much of the CO2 released during the manufacture is reabsorbed. (From Essential Natural Plasters, Henry & Therrien) According to Strawbale Building Details (Published by CASBA – California Strawbale Building Association)The strawbales themselves sequester 26 pounds of carbon each, preventing the formation of 95 pounds of CO2)

Mixing the natural hydraulic lime, plaster sand & water
Spraying the plaster
Burlap shades to protect the plastered walls from direct sun (It cures better if kept moist and cool)

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Radiused corners!
Thick walls will be used for a window seat and a deep desk
Big windows to the south

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John has been getting ready for the strawbales over the holidays. He bought a bale knife on EBay and made his own needles out of a steel rod. Pretty cool.

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We are excited.

Photo by John McBride

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Since we are in a pandemic I wasn’t able to do a more formal photoshoot of these two projects. I also was not involved in every little decision, but they turned out well and the owners are happy to have nice new kitchens now as they shelter in place.  Both projects involved removing a wall between kitchen and dining rooms, new cabinets, layout rearrangements, updated lighting, bar seating, a mix of wood and solid surface counters. One also got a skylight.

This first one was built by McBride Construction (Photos by John McBride)

Wood-topped peninsula between kitchen and dining room makes a great place to informally eat or do homework, but also serves as a buffet for the dining room

Herringbone Tile

 

 

The next one was built by 360 Property Solutions

Wall removed between dining and kitchen to let the south light flow through and connect the spaces

 

 

 

 

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www.instagram.com/p/B2PCXyDAJ5y/

Photos by the maker, John McBride

 

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John McBride and I saw a post like this at a castle in Northern Italy. It seemed like a nice detail for a little cottage in Berkeley.

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ADU Design Meeting

Saturday Morning Design Meeting

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