Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Concrete Windowsills

I’ll just share the McBride Construction Photos of the sandy colored concrete sills on the strawbale:

www.instagram.com/p/COfuDyWH_s_/

photo (& sill) by John McBride
Carriage Doors and Cobblestones
Before
Inside
Storage maximized
Even more storage
Above the workshop

The builder (John McBride) sent these photos of the interior plaster, the deep windows, and the interior all cleaned up, ready for plastering.

Remodel Alive

This was a really fun project with creative owners. It was a house with a lot of character to start with, but also in need of reorganizing and re-tuning.

It started off as a duplex. The family lived upstairs and there was a dark, low ceiling rental below. We turned it into a single family home with the addition of a stairs between the floors. The lower floor became a fun space for the two boys plus storage and we moved the water heater out of the attic into the lower floor as well. (Upgrading to an Electric heat pump water heater to serve the main house plus the new ADU behind)

It is always hard to explain the subtle rearranging of the floor plan in a remodel..but one example is flipping a door and a window in the dining area to bend the traffic flow and improve the dining area tremendously.

One of my favorite things about this project and client is the instantaneous lived-in feeling, the retention of spaces like the boys workshop where they can be messy and creative, and the addition of details like the in progress mural on the new cabinets behind the stairs.

Tons more I could say…but pictures are more fun.

Contractor – McBride Construction

Hydraulic lime plaster is similar to cement stucco, but with lime rather than portland cement. It is more flexible and more vapor permeable than cement stucco, but it takes more skill and curing time. It also requires warmer temperatures. While making portland cement requires a lot of energy and the chemical reaction releases large quantities of CO2 into the atmosphere, Manufacturing lime takes energy, but when lime plaster carbonates (hardens) much of the CO2 released during the manufacture is reabsorbed. (From Essential Natural Plasters, Henry & Therrien) According to Strawbale Building Details (Published by CASBA – California Strawbale Building Association)The strawbales themselves sequester 26 pounds of carbon each, preventing the formation of 95 pounds of CO2)

Mixing the natural hydraulic lime, plaster sand & water
Spraying the plaster
Burlap shades to protect the plastered walls from direct sun (It cures better if kept moist and cool)

We are adding some french doors to the garden, some new siding, and making the interior nicer for guitar playing and singing. This little building sits in a very nice garden.

Radiused corners!
Thick walls will be used for a window seat and a deep desk
Big windows to the south

The windows are in and the mesh has been inspected. They are getting ready for the first coat of structural lime plaster on inside and outside.

A cool photo

John McBride took this picture of our cottage project on the apocalyptic day last fall when the sky stayed dark and orange all day. Hopefully the fires will not be so bad in 2021.

I took a class in graduate school with Professor Galen Cranz called Body Conscious Design. That is where this idea started. The class was all about how to design better spaces, furniture and other things for the health of our bodies. Much of our built environment, down to the typical chair that often causes back problems, are not great for human health. This architectural detail helps prevent the atrophy of the upper body muscles. One of my projects in school had monkey bars in every hallway for an alternate means of travel.